Getting the lead out of our skies

lake_union_sunrise_seaplane_by_dsiegel
dsiegel.deviantart.com

This article was written in collaboration with Dr. Steven Gilbert and originally posted in Environmental Health News. 

The excitement of watching sea planes take off and land from Lake Union, Seattle belies their hidden danger: leaded gasoline.

While lead was removed from automobile and other transportation gasoline more than two decades ago, it’s still used in aviation gasoline, or “avgas,” to prevent knocking in over 167,000 piston-engine aircrafts around the country. According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), avgas is the single largest source of lead emissions in the country. Avgas released during flight has the potential to disperse lead widely in the environment, contaminating water bodies, soil near the air fields, and farms.

Lead is a well-known neurotoxicant, and children are particularly vulnerable to its devastating and irreversible impacts. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) says there is no safe level of blood lead in children. The EPA estimates that approximately 16 million people, including 3 million children, live or attend school within one mile of airports using leaded avgas. Researchers have found that children living close to airports with planes using avgas have higher blood lead levels than children living farther from those airports. Workers who service or refuel the aircrafts may also be exposed.

There are alternatives to avgas, and it is estimated that about 80 percent of the current piston fleet across the country could operate safely on these fuels without retrofitting. Europe already implemented policies to promote the use of unleaded alternatives. Yet, without regulatory updates in the U.S., there is little incentive for industries to change or for airports to provide alternatives.

What is the roadblock to these policy changes? To regulate lead under the Clean Air Act, the EPA must make an “endangerment finding” that documents the hazard of lead released from aviation gasoline. Despite petitions from multiple advocacy groups, however, the EPA has declined to make this determination and has insisted on the need for more data.

In the meantime, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) formed the Piston Aviation Fuel Initiative, a collaboration between FAA and industry to spur the development of additional avgas substitutes by 2018. Whether this effort delivers on its promise remains to be seen. And even if a replacement is “certified,” the FAA estimated that a complete phase out of leaded fuel could take 11 years.

To spur changes in the absence of efficient federal progress, action at the state and local levels is needed. For example, requiring airports to provide unleaded gasoline or adopting taxes on leaded gasoline to promote use of alternatives. Revenue generated could be used for soil lead testing or remediation at homes, schools, and parks near airports using leaded gasoline. We urge local policymakers to consider such initiatives in the coming legislative sessions.

recent report from the Pew Charitable Trusts calculated that removing lead from aviation fuel would prevent a 5.7 percent increase in child blood lead across the country and result in $262 million in gross future benefits.

Given the known hazards of lead exposure and the existence of alternative aviation fuels, we have an ethical responsibility to eliminate the use of avgas and protect our population from such a significant source of lead pollution.

How the U.S. is taking the lead to prevent lead poisoning

This piece was first published on the Interdisciplinary Association for Population Health Science (IAPHS) blog. You can see the original posting here.  

The crisis in Flint, Michigan, returned our attention to a problem that we would have preferred to believe was behind us: lead poisoning. This incident highlighted the dangers of lead-lined water pipes; but, unfortunately, there are numerous other sources of lead exposure throughout the United States. I’ve written previously about risks from contact with contaminated soil or through the workplace. Lead-based paint, outdoor air, and manufactured products also pose risks. Because of these diverse sources, eliminating lead poisoning is challenging and requires coordination across multiple programs and policies.

Understanding this complex need—and perhaps sensing the increased public concern regarding lead in the United States—the President’s Task Force on Environmental Health Risks and Safety Risks to Children recently released a report entitled “Key Federal Programs to Reduce Childhood Lead Exposures and Eliminate Associated Health Impacts.” This report describes the dozens of federal regulations and programs that have been established to address lead exposures in children. It also marks progress towards the development of an enhanced lead strategy that will address existing policy gaps.

The report is worth a read; you may be surprised by the number of existing policies and efforts aimed at mitigating lead exposure. There are almost 60 programs and activities administered by nine agencies and close to 30 specific regulations that address lead exposures, directly or indirectly, in children. Some of these programs and regulations include:

Together, all of these efforts have contributed to the impressive decline in blood lead levels in this country, as illustrated in the figure below.

lead-inforgraphic-2-1024x866

Despite this progress, significant challenges remain. Exposure to lead occurs disproportionately in minority and low-income families, and future work should focus on mitigating this disparity. As prescribed by Executive Order 12898, environmental justice must be a core component of agency activities.

To meet these environmental justice goals and continue to reduce lead exposure across the country, continued funding of these programs is essential. This report demonstrates that eliminating lead hazards requires parallel efforts and synergies between nine different government agencies—from the EPA to HUD, and the Department of Education to the Department of Transportation. Therefore, in the coming years, we must ensure that these agencies continue to receive the resources to be able to adequately address this critical public health issue. Call or write your representatives to voice your thoughts on the importance of protecting funding for public health agencies.

We have come so far in addressing lead in this country; let’s make sure we can finish the job completely.

Lead exposure beyond Flint—protecting our nation’s workers

This commentary was published in the September 12, 2016 edition of Environmental Health News‘ Above the Fold. To view the original version, click here: http://www.environmentalhealthnews.org/ehs/news/2016/sept/commentary-lead-exposure-beyond-flint2014protecting-our-nation2019s-workers 

By Rachel Shaffer and Steven Gilbert
Environmental Health News

Lead poisoning returned to the national consciousness this year through the tragic events in Flint, Michigan, but drinking water is only one of many exposure routes. Because of outdated federal workplace safety standards, acute and chronic occupational lead exposure occurs all too often and can harm workers and their children, who may be exposed prenatally or through lead dust carried into the home. We need to protect workers and their families by updating federal workplace lead standards based on the latest scientific research.

The U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) regulates workplace lead exposure at the national level through two standards, the general industry standard and the construction industry standard. Both of these standards are severely outdated, based on information available in the 1970s instead of the latest scientific and medical evidence.

Image adapted from CDC/NIOSH

Thus, while OSHA’s mandate is to “assure so far as possible every working man and women in the Nation safe and healthful working conditions,” these goals have not been met for workplace lead exposure.

Under the existing regulations, workers can be exposed to levels of lead that result in 60 micrograms of lead per deciliter of blood before medical removal is required, and they can return to work after their blood lead levels are as high as 40 micrograms per deciliter.

As comparison, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) defines blood lead levels above 5 micrograms per deciliter as “elevated” and has set a “Healthy People 2020” national public health goal that aims to reduce the proportion of workers with blood lead levels above 10 micrograms per deciliter.

Exposure to levels of lead much lower than what is allowable under OSHA’s current standards have been linked to high blood pressure, decreased kidney function, reproductive effects and neurological impairments.

In industries with high potential for lead exposure, such as construction, gun ranges, and battery reclaiming/manufacturing, not only are workers at risk, but their families may also be exposed inadvertently through take-home lead dust.

Children’s developing nervous systems are particularly vulnerable, and lead exposure can result in intellectual impairment. Stricter standards that require lower workplace lead levels and better personal protection will substantially reduce the dangers associated with take-home lead exposures.

In addition, since lead released from bones during pregnancy easily crosses the placenta, children born to lead-exposed workers are at risk for neurodevelopmental and other adverse health effects. Better standards will reduce potential fetal lead exposure in female workers of childbearing age.

Both California and Washington State are in the process of updating their own occupational lead standards. But, why should workers in only two states be privileged to improved health protections? OSHA standards, which cover all workers across the country, should also be strengthened to adequately protect workers and their families.

In the interim, though, enforcement of company compliance with existing federal regulations is also critical. A recent blog post from the U.S. Department of Labor described a case in which OSHA officials responded to worker complaints and cited a Wisconsin shipyard operator with 19 willful violations of the lead standard after detecting elevated blood lead levels in 75 percent of employees tested.

OSHA regulates workplace lead exposure at the national level through two standards. Both of these standards are severely outdated.The incident illustrates the importance of maintaining a well-funded OSHA ensuring it has the resources to monitor adherence to the standards. However, a draft bill for fiscal year 2017 suggests that OSHA’s budget would be cut significantly, which may prevent these enforcement activities and thus put workers at further risk.

We have the scientific and medical evidence that documents the harms of elevated blood lead levels, and we have the technology to reduce occupational lead exposure.

Now it is time to take action to put elevated workplace lead exposure behind us by rapidly adopting a standard that is aligned with CDC’s existing public health guidance, which classifies blood lead levels above 5 micrograms per deciliter as elevated.

We must strengthen OSHA standards for lead and provide sufficient support for the agency’s enforcement actions. The health of our workers – and their children – depends on it.

Outdated lead standards put Washington workers, families at risk

This op-ed originally appeared in the August 1, 2016 print edition of the Seattle Times. See here for the online posting: http://www.seattletimes.com/opinion/outdated-lead-standards-put-washington-workers-families-at-risk/ 

 

FGGM_Pb5Image credit:  https://phc.amedd.army.mil/topics/phcrspecific/north/Pages/IHD.aspx

By Rachel Shaffer and Steven Gilbert

THE tragedy in Flint, Mich., thrust lead contamination into the spotlight, and much attention has been focused rightly on the terrible consequences of childhood lead exposure.

Most people, however, are unaware that adults can also experience serious health effects from lead. As with many chemicals and hazards, workers are often more highly exposed than the general population. Examples of industries with high potential for lead exposure include construction and battery manufacturing. In these and other industries, not only are workers at elevated risk, but their families may also be exposed inadvertently through take-home lead dust.

In Washington state, there are two primary standards that regulate occupational exposure to lead: the “general industry lead standard” and the “lead in construction standard.” Unfortunately, both of these standards are severely outdated, based on information available in the 1970s instead of the latest scientific and medical evidence.

Under the existing inadequate standards, workers can be exposed to levels of lead that result in blood-lead levels up to six times higher than the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s maximum health goal for adults.

Moreover, levels of lead much lower than Washington state’s current standard have been linked to high blood pressure, decreased kidney function, reproductive effects and neurological impairments. Standards should change to reflect the latest public-health recommendations and scientific evidence.

To adequately protect workers and their families, blood-lead levels must be routinely monitored when there is any possibility of lead exposure, and individuals should be removed from their duties when their blood-lead levels are above the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health’s reference level for adults.

We have the technology to drastically reduce occupational lead exposure. We need to give workers the safe workplaces they deserve.

The health benefits of updated occupational lead standards would extend beyond workers and would also protect their children and families.

Workers often inadvertently carry lead dust on their skin and clothing when they return home, which can cause lead poisoning among family members. Stricter standards that require lower workplace lead levels and better personal protection would substantially reduce take-home lead exposures.

Second, since lead easily crosses the placenta during pregnancy, children born to lead-exposed workers are at risk for neurodevelopmental and other adverse health effects. Better standards would reduce potential fetal lead exposure in female workers of childbearing age.

The state Department of Labor and Industries should move swiftly to update our existing outdated lead standards. Workers in this state should not be subject to the health risks of lead exposure. Nor should their children suffer the secondhand consequences of this well-known poison.

It’s time to take action and give our workers and their families the protection they deserve.

For additional information on the Washington State process to update the occupational lead standard, please visit: http://lni.wa.gov/Safety/Rules/WhatsNew/LeadSafety/default.asp

 

Watch Your Step: Lead Lurking in the Soil

Thursdays are one of my favorite days of the week. Not because the weekend is approaching, but because it is when the UW Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Science seminar series takes place. Each week, an outside speaker joins us to discuss his/her research. I often leave inspired, with broadened interests, and a renewed excitement and passion for the environmental health field.

This week was no exception. I had the privilege of hearing Dr. Howard Mielke discuss his area of expertise: lead contamination in cities.

Lead has been front and center in the news recently. From the tragedy in Flint to emerging concerns about lead contamination in schools around the country, we are all now highly aware of the fact that our water supply may not be appropriately protected from outdated and dangerous lead pipes.

However, Mielke’s presentation did not focus on lead pipes. Nor the other common exposure source that I was familiar with, lead paint. Instead, he emphasized lead in soil.

Digging into the facts about lead in soil

How did lead end up in the soil?

Leaded gasoline.

Before leaded gasoline was phased out in the US in 1996, lead was emitted from tailpipes as a volatile compound (PbBr2) but quickly reacted to form a non-volatile compound (PbSO4) that precipitated to the ground (for more on the atmospheric chemistry of lead, see here and here). Thus, for years, we had millions of cars spewing lead not only into the air but also onto the ground all around us.

These automobile-related lead emissions resulted in several trends, including:

Such widespread lead contamination in the soils around our homes was a surprise to me, and these distinct patterns emphasize the terrible, lingering legacy of leaded gasoline.

But, could this really be an important exposure source, given all of the attention on lead paint and pipes?

Part of answering this question involves understanding that child blood lead levels exhibit a well-documented seasonal pattern: higher levels in the summer, and lower levels in the winter.

ijerph-13-00358-g001-1024
[from Laidlaw et al, 2016: Children’s Blood Lead Seasonality in Flint, Michigan (USA) and Soil-Sourced Lead Hazard Risks]

What could account for this variation? Mielke and others suggest that in the summer months, children spend more time outside, playing in the yard. Lead-contaminated soil ends up on their hands, on their faces, and, likely also, in their mouths. In addition, soil dust tends to be drier in the late summer and can be easily inhaled. The observed seasonal patterns suggest that lead in soil accounts for a large part of child lead exposure. If lead paint were the main source of exposure, then we would probably see peaks in the winter, when kids are cooped up inside.

A solution for soiled soil?

While replacing leaded pipes seems like a tall task, eliminating lead in the soils around us feels even more overwhelming. Mielke has led efforts in the New Orleans area to bring in clean dirt to layer on top of lead-laden dirt (for example, in children’s playgrounds). But widespread implementation of massive soil-shifting projects seems unlikely.

Perhaps a better solution is to invest in emerging bioremediation techniques, using plants and microbes?

Big picture, though, Mielke advocates for a “Clean Soil Act,” analogous to our Clean Water Act or Clean Air Act, to provide the appropriate protections for the earth beneath our feet. (In fact, he helped develop a Clean Soil Act for Norway).

In the meantime, parents should be aware of this often overlooked source of child lead exposure. In addition, it is important for urban gardeners take appropriate precautions, since lead and other heavy metals can be absorbed in plants – thereby posing potential risks through dietary intake. (For more on heavy metals in gardens, check out Environmental Health Perspectives’ Urban Gardening: Managing the Risks of Contaminated Soil)

A lesson from the past?

In closing, I’ll share one of my favorite slides from Mielke’s presentation (see image below).

IMG_3763

He displays a quotation from Yandell Henderson, a Yale professor who vehemently protested against adding lead to gasoline during a hearing in 1925. He warned that society was at a crossroads, facing “the question whether…the action of the Government is guided by [scientific] advice; or whether commercial interests are allowed to subordinate every other consideration to that of profit.”

Unfortunately, we know how that particular story ended up.

And while there have been numerous similarly discouraging stories in the realm of chemicals and children’s health, I’m still hopeful that one day soon, our country will be ready to take the other road – prioritizing public health and environmental protections over profits.